Doing More for Less

Doing More for Less

Times are changing, and so are marketing strategies. With technology becoming more advanced every day, consumers are gaining more power in their buying decisions and companies are listening to their customers more than ever before. Advertising once revolved around telling the consumer what they need and persuading them to buy it through traditional media like television, radio and newspapers.

Now, consumers have the ability to proactively research companies and products, fact-check what they are being told and ask advice of friends, families and even strangers for purchasing decisions through the power of the internet. Being a successful brand today requires forming a relationship with consumers. This means building trust and loyalty and having two-way communication instead of shouting advertising messages into the void and hoping that someone hears it.

This two-way communication must begin with companies having access to a platform on which to speak with their consumers: social media. Social media is a great tool for brands to hear what their consumers are saying about them and respond in a way that builds trust and loyalty. What’s the great news about social media? The cost to use it is substantially lower than radio buys, television commercials and newspaper ads, and it’s more effective.

The current era of technology allows brands the ability to do more with their budget for less. Companies now have the ability to reach very niche markets in a way they never could through traditional media. Marketing tools such as search engine optimization (SEO), pay-per-click advertising, geo-targeting and social media campaigns through sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn allow companies to use their marketing budget to reach their desired target market. This prevents wasting marketing dollars on reaching a huge audience that has no interest in their product or service. The digital age allows brands to increase their return on investment, and do more for less. 

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